30 Day Challenge - Preschool Success Training

 
 

As you may know, I am a mother of three amazing kids, ages 4 and under. My oldest has some special needs, so my weeks are typically sprinkled with therapy appointments, specialist appointments, etc… not to mention my other two kids and running a business! You might think that since I run a business and write a blog about strengthening brain skills, that my son has the most amazing mom and I do all sorts of brain training with him each day. Ha! Let me tell ya, I am down in the trenches right alongside the moms I work with. It is not easy to stay on top of life AND Success Training.

So, as a way to motivate myself and my fellow moms, I have created a 4 week preschool Success Training challenge. I’m excited to try this out with my 2 and 4 year olds, and I’m SO thrilled to have you join me on the ride. If you have a child from ages 2-6, this challenge is for you!

During this challenge, we’ll tackle some key skills for school readiness with a movement and game based approach! You won’t find worksheets in this challenge! Instead you’ll find instructions for movement, games, and activities to encourage brain development and skills like:

  • Midline, primitive reflex, and vestibular integration
  • Sensory integration
  • Core strength
  • Handwriting skills
  • Attention skills
  • Working memory and long term memory
  • Visual and auditory processing
  • Letter and number visualization
  • Sequencing
  • And more!!

This is NOT an academic skills challenge. It’s a way to introduce play based learning and brain development into your day in a unique way! The skills taught in this course are meant to help build academic skills by strengthening the underlying skills needed in order to be successful in school.

How do the skills listed above help with academic success? In SO many ways! Here are a few examples:

Beginning readers need to be able to…

  • sound out words (phonemic awareness and auditory processing)
  • read the words correctly (visual processing and tracking)
  • hold the sounds together to make a word (sequencing and working memory)
  • remember the word when they come across it again later on the page (working memory)
  • stay focused through the page (attention skills)
  • remember what they read so they can put the story together (working memory and comprehension)
  • create a movie in their mind of what they are reading (visualization)

Wow, that’s a LOT of brain skills for beginning readers! Can you see it’s so important to make sure your child has a strong foundation in these skills?

So, if you have a child just getting started with academics, or if your child is struggling in math or reading, don’t delay! Sign up at the link below! This challenge begins April 9th!